Wednesday, December 17, 2014

WisOpinion

WisOpinion



Help us secure safer neighborhoods throughout Wisconsin

By Tom Barrett, Joel Kleefisch

The column below reflects the views of the authors, and these opinions are neither endorsed nor supported by WisOpinion.com . 

The most important responsibility we have as adults is to protect our children from harm, and to keep them safe at school, daycare and in our neighborhoods. In general, residency requirements for convicted sex offenders establish restrictions in areas where children are present. Given this commitment to our children, it is no surprise many Wisconsin communities have raced to enact ordinances mandating residency requirements for convicted sex offenders. Recently, Milwaukee passed legislation after witnessing an increase of sex offenders living within the city. The problem moving forward is an emerging patchwork quilt of laws due to many communities enacting their own residency restrictions that vary in detail. That is why this issue needs to be immediately addressed. Without consistent residency restrictions across the state, we risk children's safety by perpetuating a system that fails to appropriately place dangerous offenders. 

Our priority during the upcoming legislative session is to create a bipartisan coalition that will pass a uniform statewide sex offender placement law, requiring offenders to reside at least 1,000 feet away from schools, daycares, and other areas where children are known to congregate. 

In 2005, Assembly Bill 557 authored by Rep. Joel Kleefisch (R- Oconomowoc) was the first of its kind to shed light on the issue of mandating residency requirements for convicted sex offenders living within Wisconsin's communities. Unfortunately, this legislation and 2009 Senate Bill 548, authored by Sen. Lena Taylor (D-Milwaukee) did not have the support to pass both houses of the state Legislature. While we may have different views on a number of issues, we are confident that our concern for Wisconsin's children will rise above partisan politics. We must come together to enact this important legislation to make our communities safer places to raise a family. 

Across the state, communities have faced issues with the placement of sex offenders after they have completed their sentence. In the Village of Allouez, a community just outside of Green Bay, many leaders were shocked to see the population of convicted sex offenders more than double since 2008, one year after the city of Green Bay passed their sex offender residency restriction. As a result, Allouez had no choice but to pass its own ordinance earlier this year. The same pattern happened in Milwaukee, where in two ZIP codes the sex offender population increased more than 40 percent since 2007, the year before several other municipalities in Milwaukee County enacted their own residency restrictions. 

These offenders have committed state crimes, were prosecuted by state prosecutors, and are imprisoned and monitored by the state Department of Corrections. It is time for the state to step in and support all communities in Wisconsin with an equitable and uniform standard of residency restriction, so that our communities don't face the challenge of becoming a dumping ground for dangerous individuals. Every resident deserves safety. 

Together, we need to be cognizant of where registered sex offenders reside. Through this law, our commitments and responsibilities to the people of Wisconsin are met, and safer more secure neighborhoods are in place for future generations. 

-- Barrett is mayor of Milwaukee. Kleefisch, R-Oconomowoc, represents Wisconsin's 38th Assembly District.

Monday, November 24, 2014

Man wrongly jailed for 525 days under sex offender's name | www.wsbtv.com

Man wrongly jailed for 525 days under sex offender's name | www.wsbtv.com

US~Observer - Robert Haro - Malicious Mistaken Identity

US~Observer - Robert Haro - Malicious Mistaken Identity

Man awarded $890,000 in defamation lawsuit - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

Man awarded $890,000 in defamation lawsuit - wistv.com - Columbia, South Carolina |

When the Only Crime Is Having a Common Name | NBC Chicago

When the Only Crime Is Having a Common Name | NBC Chicago

Angry mob in Denver attacks man thought to be sexual predator | Fox News

Angry mob in Denver attacks man thought to be sexual predator | Fox News

Mistaken Identity Labels Innocent Man a Sex Offender - News from InsideEdition.com

Mistaken Identity Labels Innocent Man a Sex Offender - News from InsideEdition.com

Sex offender released from jail after case of 'mistaken identity' | Local & Regional News | Eugene News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KVAL CBS 13

Sex offender released from jail after case of 'mistaken identity' | Local & Regional News | Eugene News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News | KVAL CBS 13

Mistaken identity leads to jail time

Mistaken identity leads to jail time

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

2-year-old hit and killed trick or treating in Lake Wales - WINK-TV News

Lock up all the SO's to make Halloween safe for kids..... Riiiiiiight.... Seems like there is more danger just crossing the road whilst trick or treating...



2-year-old hit and killed trick or treating in Lake Wales - WINK-TV News



7-year-old girl hit by car in Vancouver on Halloween night dies - KPTV - FOX 12



Teen boy struck, killed after trick-or-treating in Apopka | Orange



Trick-or-treaters killed by speeding car - AOL.com



Father Killed and Son in Critical Condition after Being Hit by Car While Trick-or-Treating in Irvine | NBC Southern California



'Man Who Killed Halloween' remembered 40 years later | News - Home



Reports: 3 trick-or-treaters killed in California hit-and-run - WTVM.com-Columbus, GA News Weather & Sports



3-year-old killed in crash while trick-or-treating



End the madness, vote out all incumbents today!

Court ruling upends Maryland's sex offender registry - Baltimore Sun

Court ruling upends Maryland's sex offender registry - Baltimore Sun

MAILBAG: Drunken drivers a greater Halloween threat : Baraboo News Republic

MAILBAG: Drunken drivers a greater Halloween threat : Baraboo News Republic

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

ATSA 2014 SO Residence Restrictions.pdf - Google Drive

ATSA 2014 SO Residence Restrictions.pdf - Google Drive



Conclusions



ATSA does not support the use of residence restriction laws as a sex offender management strategy. Sexual abuse is most likely to occur within a pre-existing relationship between the sexual offender and the victim, and there is no evidence that residential proximity to schools, playgrounds, day cares, parks, and recreation centers increases sexual reoffending. There is no research to support the effectiveness of residence restrictions in reducing sexual recidivism and these types of policies often have the unintended

consequence that may compromise, rather than promote, public safety. The prevention of sexual abuse requires a well-planned, comprehensive, interdisciplinary response founded on evidence based strategies and policies that both protect communities and support the rehabilitation of offenders. It is therefore recommended that states and local jurisdictions seek effective methods to manage sexual offender risk while providing services that facilitate successful reintegration.

Folha de S.Paulo - Internacional - En - Brazil - "Vogue Kids" Magazine Accused of Publishing Sexualized Images of Children - 12/09/2014

Folha de S.Paulo - Internacional - En - Brazil - "Vogue Kids" Magazine Accused of Publishing Sexualized Images of Children - 12/09/2014

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Group asks for more prison reforms : Beaver Dam Daily Citizen

Group asks for more prison reforms : Beaver Dam Daily Citizen



MILWAUKEE (AP) — A coalition of church congregations demanding reforms within the Wisconsin Department of Corrections launched the second phase of its campaign Wednesday, calling on state officials to provide more services and options for offenders on parole.
WISDOM, an umbrella organization, began its “Reform Now” campaign last month in Madison. Its demands at the time included letting more prisoners out on parole and ending solitary confinement. The group expanded its focus Wednesday to include revocation, the process through which offenders who have been released on extended supervision are re-imprisoned for violating the terms of their release.
Coalition members held a news conference outside the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility, where they argued that revocation makes it harder for offenders to put their lives back together, leading to a dysfunctional community and angry citizens.
WISDOM Vice President Willie Brisco said he didn’t want the anger to boil over in Wisconsin and lead to the sort of civil unrest that erupted in a St. Louis-area suburb in recent weeks after a white police officer shot and killed an unarmed black teen.
“We will not become a Ferguson, Missouri, where we let all of these things go about unanswered until they blow up in our faces,” Brisco said. “This is a proactive method we are using to address these situations.”
WISDOM speakers said offenders out on release should face revocation only if they break a new law.
Currently, an offender can be revoked for missing a scheduled parole meeting, being more than 15 minutes past curfew or crossing county lines without permission. The speakers acknowledged that those who break rules should be punished, but they said the level of discipline should match the severity of the offense.
The Rev. Joseph Jackson of the Friendship Baptist Church held Minnesota up as an example. Offenders there who violate minor rules of supervision may be given the chance to participate in a sanctions conference, in which the agent, offender and others discuss the violation and determine an appropriate course of action.
Wisconsin Department of Corrections spokeswoman Joy Staab said about 40 percent of revoked offenders were classified as violent offenders last year.
“An administrative law judge makes the final revocation decision at a revocation hearing,” she said in an email. “Public safety is the primary consideration in any revocation decision.”
At the WISDOM news conference, Charlotte Mertins talked about how the system thwarted the rehabilitation of her fiancé, Hector Cubero.
He was part of a group that robbed and killed a person in 1981. He served more than 27 years before being paroled in 2008, but the budding tattoo artist had to go back to prison two years ago for tattooing a minor who falsely claimed he was 18, Mertins said.
“My family and I live day to day feeling helpless toward Hector’s situation,” she said.
WISDOM plans to hold a monthly news conference through October to draw attention to aging inmates, overcrowding and solitary confinement, which the group likens to torture.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Policing and Wrongful Convictions

Policing and Wrongful Convictions



Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety

This is one in a series of papers that will be published as a result of the Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety.



Harvard’s Executive Sessions are a convening of individuals of independent standing who take joint responsibility for rethinking and improving society’s responses to an issue. Members are selected based on their experiences, their reputation for thoughtfulness and their potential for helping to disseminate the work of the Session.



In the early 1980s, an Executive Session on Policing helped resolve many law enforcement issues of the day. It produced a number of papers and concepts that revolutionized policing. Thirty years later, law enforcement has changed and NIJ and the Harvard Kennedy School are again collaborating to help resolve law enforcement issues of the day.

Wrongful Convictions and Postconviction Testing Postconviction Testing and Wrongful Convictions

Wrongful Convictions and Postconviction Testing Postconviction Testing and Wrongful Convictions



Overview of Wrongful Convictions

The strength of our criminal justice system depends on its accuracy — its ability to convict the guilty and to clear the innocent. But we know that wrongful convictions happen. Identifying and understanding the causes of wrongful convictions is critical to maintaining the integrity of our justice system.
A conviction may be classified as wrongful for two reasons:
  1. The person convicted is factually innocent of the charges.
  2. There were procedural errors that violated the convicted person's rights.
A wrongful conviction based on possible factual innocence can sometimes be detected using postconviction DNA testing.

Papers From the Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety | National Institute of Justice

Papers From the Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety | National Institute of Justice



Papers From the Harvard Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety

Following are the papers from the second Executive Session on Policing and Public Safety, sponsored by NIJ and the Harvard Kennedy School's Program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management.
The papers from the first executive session have become become a foundation for police executive training across the nation and we hope that these new papers have a similar impact.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Who's Lying, Who's Self-Justifying? Origins of the He Said/She Said Gap ...

Leaders collaborate to combat inmate sex abuse

Leaders collaborate to combat inmate sex abuse

OWNER OF WEBSITES LOSES CASE IN FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT | CA RSOL

OWNER OF WEBSITES LOSES CASE IN FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT | CA RSOL

Sex stings prioritize press conferences ahead of constitutional rights

Sex stings prioritize press conferences ahead of constitutional rights



This is the second of a two-part series examining how law enforcement is blurring the lines on due process.
POLK COUNTY, Florida – Law enforcement agencies have widespread support for combating sexual predators and crimes against children. But, police chiefs and sheriffs across Florida remain split on how far an agency should go to round up potential offenders.
Nowhere in Florida is the appetite greater to charge men with sexual crimes than it is in Polk County.
However, 10 Investigates found Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd has created – and promoted – a culture that prioritizes press conferences and public humiliation over due process and constitutional rights.
Asked at a Tuesday press conference why he was still accusing men of being "sexual predators" and touting their mugshots, even after they had been cleared of wrongdoing, Judd blamed a weak legal system and maintained they were "sexual perverts."
Judd called the press conference to tout a total of 132 arrests in undercover "To Catch a Predator"-style stings since March. Some of the men were believed to be involved in child porn or other crimes. However, the overwhelming majority had no previous history of any sexual offenses.
In fact, a 10 Investigates analysis of more than 1,200 men arrested in Florida predator stings since 2008 reveals 97% had no history of previous sexual offenses, leading critics to suggest the stings create more crime than they actually solve.
And while sheriffs often highlight the mugshots of particularly egregious offenders, 10 Investigates has learned most men arrested are in their teens or 20s. Many of them were only online to look for women their own age when officers baited them, then switched their age and tried to convince the men to break the law. More and more cases are being thrown out by judges for entrapment.
Yet even the men who are cleared of wrongdoing can never escape the stigma of having their name and mugshot paraded out in front of local media. Courts may expunge records, but not Google searches.
That particular fact, seemingly at odds with the concept of "innocent until proven guilty," is one that Judd takes particular pride in. He has made light of the fact that Florida's public record laws ensure men can never escape a sexual offense arrest, even if they are cleared of wrongdoing.
Although Judd and other law enforcement leaders say the press conferences are designed to act as deterrents, there was little drop in arrest numbers for years. Judd has said it's because there are more sex offenders in Florida than law enforcement will ever be able to round up.
But when 10 Investigates started asking questions about how the stings operate and how far officers were going to arrest men, the totals dropped off noticeably, from several dozen arrests per sting to a median of just 13 arrests per sting in the last five months.
Many of the men are also offered much-reduced plea deals with little or no jail time, as the courts determine they are unlikely to commit crimes on real children.
The prosecution troubles and lack of real victims are some of the reasons many law enforcement agencies - including the entire South Florida Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC) - has largely quit the "To Catch a Predator"-style stings.
Yet in West/Central Florida, Judd's culture has spread like a wildfire. Participating agencies include the sheriff's offices in Pinellas, Manatee, Citrus, and Sarasota counties, as well as the police departments in Orlando, North Port, and Clearwater.
The stings and press conferences held in Pinellas County pose an especially interesting contraction, as Sheriff Bob Gualtieri used to remove mugshots from his agency's website if a person was found not guilty. Now, he doesn't post any mugshotsto protect defendants who may have "made a bad decision."
But several times in the last year, Gualtieri has held press conferences where the names and mugshots of defendants were circulated to the media. And even though some have yet to be charged, while others have seen their charges dropped, their mugshots remain on the websites of local media outlets.
10 Investigates has also been fighting for public records on how the stings operate, but neither Judd nor Gualtieri have been forthcoming.
Law enforcement has failed to provide public records to 10 Investigates on the following issues:
  • The language in the ads detectives post.
  • How detectives responded when innocent men showed no interest in speaking to teens.
  • If detectives are doing the stings because there is a problem of teens looking for adults online.
  • How many men get baited before detectives find someone to investigate.
Ironically, the Polk County Sheriff's Office posted on its Facebook page Friday that Florida's public record laws include "Practically everything!" It added, "if we don't release public records, we can be charged with a crime."
10 Investigates will continue to press for transparency to make sure law enforcement officials are following the laws they're entrusted to enforce.

NH High court may strike down sex offender public registry as punishment | Citizens for Criminal Justice Reform – New Hampshire

NH High court may strike down sex offender public registry as punishment | Citizens for Criminal Justice Reform – New Hampshire



This link contains the legal brief as well...

Friday, August 8, 2014

Grady Judd's sex stings under microscope with officers breaking rules

Grady Judd's sex stings under microscope with officers breaking rules



POLK COUNTY, Florida – In the decade since Chris Hansen and "To Catch a Predator" popularized Internet sex stings, more than 1,200 men in Florida alone have been arrested, accused of preying on underage teens and children for sex.
But as the stings put more and more men behind bars, detectives are working harder and harder to keep up their arrest numbers. And the tactics they're using to put alleged sexual offenders in jail are sweeping up large numbers of law-abiding men, too.
A yearlong investigation by 10 Investigates reveals many of the men whose mugshots have been paraded out by local sheriffs in made-for-TV press conferences were not seeking to meet children online. Instead, they were minding their own business, looking for other adults, when detectives started to groom and convince them to break the law.
While detectives used to post ads suggesting an underage teen or child was available for sex, they now routinely post more innocuous personal ads of adults on traditional dating sites. When men – many of them under 25 with no criminal history - respond, officers switch the bait and typically indicate their age is really 14 or 15 years old. However, sometimes the storyline isn't switched until the men, who were looking for legal love, already start falling for the undercover agent.
According to arrest affidavits inspected by 10 Investigates, law enforcement is also now routinely making first contact with men who have done nothing wrong, responding to their ads on dating sites like PlentyOfFish.com. After men start conversing with what they think are adults, officers change the age they claim to be, but try to convince the men to continue the conversation anyway.
Officers bend rules in sex stings to boost arrest totals.
Other examples include undercover officers showing interest in a man, then later introducing the idea of having sex with the undercover's "child." If the men indicate they weren't interested, they were still often arrested for just talking to the adult.
Critics of the stings, including a number of prominent Tampa Bay law enforcement leaders, tell 10 News the operations make for better press conferences than they do crime fighting. Many of the men who are arrested for sexual predator crimes see little jail time.
But Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd, when asked about over-aggressive detectives, instead went on the offensive: "The concern (I have) is that you inflate your investigative reporting to make it glitzy."
Judges have also been very critical of some of the tactics used in the stings, which violate Internet Crimes Against Children guidelines. Among the comments from judges in recent entrapment decisions (case numbers withheld to protect the defendants):
  • "It was the agent who repeatedly steered the conversation back to sexual activity with a minor."
  • "The government made a concerted effort to lure him into committing a crime."
  • "The undercover officer failed to follow the procedures …"
  • "The law does not tolerate government action to provoke a law-abiding citizen to commit a crime."
The judge in one dismissed case criticized the undercover officer for failing to follow procedures and "the officer controlled the tone, pace and subject matter of online conversation, pushing toward a discussion of sexual activity."
The blurring of legal and ethical lines has led many agencies such as the Pasco County Sheriff's Office, the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office, and most of South Florida to focus their cybercrime resources on other areas of online abuse. Instead of conducting "To Catch a Predator"-style stings, they spend their time and effort on areas where there are known victims and children at immediate risk, like child porn and sex trafficking.
But the time- and resource-intensive predator stings are still alive and well in West/Central Florida, operating under the watchful eye of ICAC task force leader Judd.
Grady Judd's 'favorite topic'
Sheriff of Polk County since 2005, Judd has made it clear that targeting sexual predators is his top priority. He called hunting predators his "favorite topic" at a recent predator sting press conference, and he has invited national media outlets along for some of the operations. The predator stings have been featured in three MSNBC specials as well as a recent CNN series.
But Judd has been much less forthcoming when it comes to questions of how detectives lure in their targets and whether innocent men are getting swept up to.
Judd has failed to provide public records to 10 Investigates on the following issues:
  • The language in the ads detectives post.
  • How detectives responded when innocent men showed no interest in speaking to teens.
  • If detectives are doing the stings because there is a problem of teens looking for adults online.
  • How many men get baited before detectives find someone to investigate.
Judd said the overwhelming majority of men who communicate with detectives do the "right thing" and either end communication or report the officer posing as an underage teen -- or parent offering up a child -- to authorities. But he won't even turn over those communications over, a possible violation of Florida State Statute 119.
Judd says the records are exempt from state records laws because all of those men are still "under investigation," for they may surface in future stings. However, that indicates Judd - and other law enforcement leaders around Tampa Bay and Sarasota who have now used the same exemption to withhold records - have active investigations open on hundreds, if not thousands, of men who did nothing more than legally communicate with adults on legal websites.
The state's best-known lawman also showed little concern for due process during a Tuesday press conference to tout arrests since March in predator-style stings. He pointed to 132 mugshots on a giant posterboard and called the men "sexual predators."
But when 10 Investigates pointed out some of the men had already been cleared of charges, he said they were still fair game because "we have a very liberal - a very forgiving - criminal justice system."
That system may give defendants the benefit of doubt and assume "innocent until proven guilty;" but Judd makes sure the mugshots and stigma of being arrested for a sex crime haunts the men for the rest of their lives.
Critics point out many of the 1,200 men who are ultimately arrested in Florida and called "sexual predators" weren't preying or even looking for kids; many were seeking adults. The majority of them were in their teens or 20s at the time, and approximately 97 percent of the men had zero history of any sexual crimes or accusations.
"The biggest waste ever"
While countless West/Central Florida law enforcement agencies have gotten involved in the predator stings, including the sheriff's offices in Polk, Pinellas, Manatee, Citrus, and Sarasota, some agencies were noticeably absent at Judd's season-ending press conference.
Judd indicated the Hillsborough sheriff's office was a part of the operation, but was unable to attend. However, an HCSO spokesperson said the the agency has not been a participant.
While HCSO has a full-time "Internet Predator" unit, it has been reluctant to dedicate the huge resources needed for a "To Catch a Predator"-style sting. Instead, HCSO detectives are focused on offenders that are participating in "the proliferation of child porn," focusing on infants and young children who are exploited.
Hillsborough detectives say those type of arrests tend to yield better conviction rates, longer prison terms, and also provide law enforcement other leads on areas of crime like sex trafficking.
Pasco Sheriff Chris Nocco has adopted similar priorities, saying his cybercrime unit is extremely proactive and focused on the areas of the worst abuse.
"Any way you can take a sexual predator off the street is tremendous," Nocco said. "Especially those that are online looking at child pornography ... they may do something physically against a young little kid."
Pasco also spends a lot of time and effort focused on teen-on-teen cybercrime because it can often be addressed before it ruins a person's life permanently.
Nocco was complimentary of ICAC, but says he's not a huge fan of the "To Catch a Predator"-style stings, saying the prosecutions often don't hold up.
"You spend your resources, you arrest somebody and then they walk right out. It's the biggest waste ever," Nocco said.
ICAC stings typically cost tens of thousands of dollars - sometimes close to $100,000 - in costs and officers' time, and that doesn't include the costs to prosecute and jail defendants.
10 Investigates found light plea sentences are sometimes offered because the suspects simply aren't considered dangerous offenders, contrary to Judd's claims.
Local law enforcement leaders also refused to turn over ICAC guidelines, claiming they were confidential investigative material. But a copy 10 Investigates obtained through court records indicates the online undercover stings, which typically don't involve real children or victims, are not even specified in the list of priorities agencies are supposed to target:
  1. A child is at immediate risk of victimization.
  2. A child is vulnerable to victimization by a known offender.
  3. A known suspect is aggressively soliciting a child(ren).
  4. Manufacturers, distributors or possessors of images that appear to be home photography with domiciled children.
  5. Aggressive, high-volume child pornography manufacturers or distributors who either are commercial distributors, repeat offenders, or specialize in sadistic images.
  6. Manufacturers, distributors, or solicitors involved in high-volume trafficking or belong to an organized child pornography ring that operates as a criminal conspiracy.
  7. Distributors, solicitors and possessors of images of child pornography.
  8. Any other form of child victimization.
Almost all of South Florida's law enforcement agencies have moved away from the stings as well. The Broward County Sheriff's Office, which is in charge of the South Florida ICAC task force, told 10 Investigates it was time for the agency to move on to other areas of cybercrime fighting.
The "other" victims
There may be no excuses for men who victimize children or those that look for underage victims online.
However, it's easier to make the case for the men who were swept up in the stings when they were looking online for adults.
"(My son) was stalked by law enforcement for three days," said the mother of a 22-year-old arrested in one of the stings. 10 Investigates is protecting the identity of her family.
The son was on Craiglist's personals pages, looking to meet other adults. He responded to a "no strings attached" ad for a 26-year-old woman. He says her story changed a few times, including the claim she was only 13, but he was skeptical.
He spoke on the phone to the undercover and she sent a photo, in which she was wearing a wedding ring. He said he was sure she was an adult (she was), so he made plans to meet her. When he arrived, he was arrested. He was later sentenced to two years of house arrest and a lifetime as a registered sex offender.
"He had a life of promise; he had an education," his mother said. "That's all been shot."
She says her son is paying the price of opportunistic lawmen.
Board-certified defense attorney Anthony Ryan says law enforcement officers have become experts in coercing innocent men into breaking the law.
"They are really good at subtly turning conversations and normal statements into sexual innuendo - whether or not the other side intended that," he said.
Ryan, who has a practice in Sarasota, just got a 23-year-old client's case dismissed in Manatee. A judge ruled deputies entrapped his client, writing that their tactics had "no place in modern day law enforcement."
Ryan adds that officers are pushing the boundaries further and further to keep up their arrest numbers and keep the federal ICAC grants flowing. And responding to legal ads on legal dating sites crosses the line.
"Once the low-hanging fruit is sort of gone, taken off the tree," Ryan said, "there's still pressure from high above to justify these actions."

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

It's Time to Reduce, Reconstruct, Reclassify, Rethink and Reform the Virginia Sex Offender Registry: Action Alert: U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill’s S269...

It's Time to Reduce, Reconstruct, Reclassify, Rethink and Reform the Virginia Sex Offender Registry: Action Alert: U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill’s S269...: Virginia Senator Mark Warner (a co-sponsor of S2692) was one of the 8 Representatives that stood in front of the media last week (befo...

Allouez moves to block sex offenders

Allouez moves to block sex offenders

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

DNA evidence could reverse conviction; sexual assault was from 1995

DNA evidence could reverse conviction; sexual assault was from 1995

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

Solitary confinement system doesn't work: Other View

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Former prison staffer sentenced for sex acts with inmate

Former prison staffer sentenced for sex acts with inmate



Protecting their own again.  She committed a sex crime from a position of power, anyone else would have gotten confinement, she only got probation and not much of it either.



The registry will punish her over time, but unfortunately that isn't the point here.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Church coalition seeks Wisconsin prison reforms

Church coalition seeks Wisconsin prison reforms



MADISON — A coalition of church congregations launched a campaign Wednesday calling for reforms within the Wisconsin Department of Corrections, including letting more prisoners out on parole, releasing aging inmates, alleviating overcrowding and ending solitary confinement.
WISDOM, an umbrella organization of congregations from around Wisconsin, began its "Reform Now" campaign with a news conference in the state Capitol. Organizers focused on the parole prong of the campaign, railing about the Parole Commission failing to release hundreds of eligible prisoners.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

State should note Wisconsin youth offender study - Clovis News Journal

State should note Wisconsin youth offender study - Clovis News Journal



Interesting.... If we could get Wisconsin to see that they should apply this logic on all offenders, not just juveniles, and see the recidivism rates drop.



There will always be those that will re-offend, but many, if not most, with treatment won't re-offend.

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Wisconsin Rep. Kramer due in court on assault charges - TwinCities.com

Wisconsin Rep. Kramer due in court on assault charges - TwinCities.com



State Rep. Bill Kramer is expected to plead not guilty to charges that he groped a woman's breasts following a Republican fundraiser.
Kramer is the Assembly's former majority leader. He's charged with two counts of second-degree sexual assault.
He's due in court Thursday for a preliminary hearing. Defense attorney Eduardo Borda told reporters last month that his client would plead not guilty.
Kramer has represented Waukesha, an ultra-conservative city in southeastern Wisconsin, since 2006.
Majority Republicans took away his leadership position after allegations surfaced that he may have sexually harassed a lobbyist and a Wisconsin legislative staffer in February.
After those allegations were revealed, another woman said Kramer attacked her as well during an event in Muskego three years ago. Those allegations led to the criminal charges.


Shafter suspends enfocement of sex offender ordinance | Local & Regional News | Bakersfield Now - News, Weather and Sports

Shafter suspends enfocement of sex offender ordinance | Local & Regional News | Bakersfield Now - News, Weather and Sports



SHAFTER, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) — The city of Shafter may repeal an ordinance that bans sex offenders from parks, schools, libraries and other places.

The city has already agreed to stop enforcing it, and five other cities in Kern County, which have similar ordinances, may follow suit.

Shafter adopted the ordinance in 2007. A statewide nonprofit group called California Reform Sex Offender Laws has been targeting cities with rules that restrict where sex offenders can be.


Continue reading...

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Arizona - Court hammers operator of Internet intimidation sites

Court hammers operator of Internet intimidation sites



A Valley man accused of running an Internet extortion racket was dealt a blow last month when a judge found he posted information on websites suggesting a decorated combat veteran with no criminal record was a child molester.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Katherine Cooper imposed several sanctions against Charles "Chuck" Rodrick, saying evidence showed he controlled websites where operators demanded money from sex offenders and harassed those who complained.

In a seven-page ruling March 26, Cooper found Rodrick controlled the websites, owned the domain names and violated court orders to remove posts involving three people he sued for defamation after they publicly decried the websites, including his ex-wife and her boyfriend and a convicted sex offender from Washington.

"He is the administrator for these websites and, in that capacity, is the only person capable of adding or removing information from these websites," Cooper wrote.

Monday, January 13, 2014

In the news by Karen Franklin PhD: Putting the Cart Before the Horse: The Forensic Application of the SRA-FV

In the news by Karen Franklin PhD: Putting the Cart Before the Horse: The Forensic Application of the SRA-FV

Sunday, January 12, 2014

Putting the Cart Before the Horse: The Forensic Application of the SRA-FV

As the developers of actuarial instruments such as the Static-99R acknowledge that their original norms inflated the risk of re-offense for sex offenders, a brand-new method is cropping up to preserve those inflated risk estimates in sexually violent predator civil commitment trials. The method introduces a new instrument, the “SRA-FV,” in order to bootstrap special “high-risk” norms on the Static-99R. Curious about the scientific support for this novel approach, I asked forensic psychologist and statistics expert Brian Abbott to weigh in.

Guest post by Brian Abbott, PhD*

NEWS FLASH: Results from the first peer-reviewed study about the Structured Risk Assessment: Forensic Version (“SRA-FV”), published in Sexual Abuse: Journal of Research and Treatment (“SAJRT”), demonstrate the instrument is not all that it’s cracked up to be.

To read more: In the news by Karen Franklin PhD: Putting the Cart Before the Horse: The Forensic Application of the SRA-FV